I wrote three paragraphs. Finally. Three!

At my church for the past few weeks, we've been observing Lent and meditating on the (new) Stations of the Cross. I've helped organize and facilitate some of that. Below are the meditations I wrote for this week, the final week of Lent—   Twelfth Station: Jesus Speaks to His Mother and Disciple (John 19:25-27) … Continue reading I wrote three paragraphs. Finally. Three!

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Chase us. Bug us. Haunt us. Woo us. —A communion prayer (4).

Our Father, We are tired. And we hurt. And we twist inwardly. In the evening, before bed; while we sleep and dream or stay awake alone; while we wake in the morning, eat, shower, arrive; and even now as we gather in your Name: there is this Something and this Something Else. And if I … Continue reading Chase us. Bug us. Haunt us. Woo us. —A communion prayer (4).

More tragic or more beautiful. —A communion prayer (3).

We surround your table: we perverts, we thieves, we prostitutes, we cheaters, we racists, we who are lazy, we who use food to console ourselves, we who drink too much, who manipulate, who lie, who control, who rage, who hate, who refuse others forgiveness, we full of self-pity, we who give up hope, we prideful, … Continue reading More tragic or more beautiful. —A communion prayer (3).

Malachai. Beethoven. Sigur Rós. —A communion prayer (2).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IVLP-URFgQo   At first I cannot decide whether to read your oracle to Malachi in silence, or while listening to music. I choose music. Then I cannot decide whether Beethoven’s 9th Symphony or the Parantheses album by Sigur Rós will be more appropriate—whether the promise of joy, or of curse. I choose Sigur Rós; I choose … Continue reading Malachai. Beethoven. Sigur Rós. —A communion prayer (2).

Chew slowly. Taste but do not savor. —A communion prayer (1).

In storytelling, if you want to make a thing matter to your audience, you have to repeat the same events over and over again. This is why in Homer’s Iliad, at the beginning and at the end, fathers beg for mercy and pity, for their children to be released to them: Have pity, they say. … Continue reading Chew slowly. Taste but do not savor. —A communion prayer (1).